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Lautner Farms Latest News

WANT TO ADD COLOR? LAUTNER FARMS HAS THE BEST COLORED SIRES IN THE INDUSTRY!

Author: Kristy

CALL AND ADD SOME COLOR TO YOUR NEXT SEMEN ORDER!!

800-515-3284

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Wolf Show Cattle Online Sales

Author: Kristy

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GIVE LAUTNER FARMS A CALL TODAY AND TRY THESE NEW FOR 2014 SIRES…800-515-3284

Author: Kristy

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Durban Cattle‎

Author: Kristy

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Grand and Reserve Champion Prospect Steer 2014 Minnesota State Fair

Author: Kristy

Grand Champion Prospect Steer
2014 Minnesota State Fair
Shown By Dylan Mente
Raised By Dave Mente
Sired By Bodacious

Reserve Grand Champion Prospect Steer
2014 Minnesota State Fair
Shown By Netzke Family
Raised By Netzke Family
Sired By Monopoly/Monopoly Clone
Out Of Hairy Bear Donor

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Champion and Reserve Champion Maine Anjou Breeding Heifer 2014 Minnesota State Fair

Author: Kristy

Champion Maine Anjou Breeding Heifer
2014 Minnesota State Fair
Shown by Caleb Landin
Raised and sold by Schmitt | Wisconsin
Sired By I-80

Reserve Champion Chi Breeding Heifer
2014 Minnesota State Fair
Shown by Shelby Hartwig
Sold by Schmitt | Wisconsin
Sired By Monopoly/Monopoly Clone

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UNCLE SI- SEMEN AVAILABLE NOW, THRU LAUTNER FARMS! CALL TODAY 800-515-3284

Author: Kristy

Want to add the Shorthorn color and not give up any crossbred power? Uncle Si will deliver. Out of the same cow as War Eagle and being a full brother to Abby Badger’s steer. how can anyone not be excited about Uncle Si! In addition, he is TH FREE & PHA FREE and that is a fact jack!!  Hang on to your hat, Uncle Si will take colored genetics to a whole new level. Join in on the excitement and add Uncle Si in your breeding plans! 

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Neil Cattle Co Private Treaty Bid off Sale- 9-14

Author: Kristy

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Walk This Way: Order Today From Lautner Farms: 800-515-3284

Author: Kristy

WITH SONS LIKE UNCLE SI, ABBY BADGERS STEER AND A HOST OF OTHERS, HOW CAN THIS BULL NOT BE ON YOUR LIST OF ONES TO USE FOR 2014? THIS ONE PERFECTS WHAT OTHER’S TRIED TO PERFECT. WALKS THIS WAY’S POPULARITY GAINED STEAM AS THE SEASON PROGRESSED. BE PART OF THE PROGRESSION! ORDER TODAY 800-515-3284  

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Minnaert show cattle online Sale- September 3rd

Author: Kristy

Our first online offering of steer and heifers will be on Caldwell-Willoughby Sales September 3rd! Contact Jason Minnaert (309) 489-6024 or Nick Anderson (712) 660-0789 with your questions.

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GOOD AS GOLD- SEMEN NOW AVAILABLE THRU LAUTNER FARMS! GIVE US A CALL 800-515-3284

Author: Kristy

 Never before has there been the unique opportunity to use genetics of 2 Houston Grand Champion Steers combined into one great TH & PHA Free package.  The sire Solid Gold cell line was purchased by us and a cell line was taken at 6 months of age.  Good as gold cell line was purchased by us and taken at approximately at 7 months of age Which in itself shows what we thought of both long before the Houston Steer Show made them famous.  How can you find a sire with a more power packed genetic make up?? We don’t think you can.  Seems the name is so fitting Good as Gold.  

 

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Defining stockmanship

Author: Kristy

Stockmanship,

like sustainability, is a commonly used word that many might find hard to clearly define in a few words. Stockmanship has been defined as the knowledgeable and skillful handling of livestock in a safe, efficient, effective, and low-stress manner and denotes a low-stress, integrated, comprehensive, holistic approach to livestock handling (Stockmanship Journal). However, stockmanship is more than just handling. It is concerned with the whole life of the animal in our care. We used to call it animalhusbandry or stewardship. First and foremost, stockmanship is livestock centered. By that I mean, we must consider the natural behavior and needs of the animal or group. There are 3 essential elements of good stockmanship: an environment that provides protection and comfort appropriate for the species; adequate, well designed facilities that enables low stress handling; and a comprehensive, herd health management program.

Low stress handling begins long before cattle are gathered from the pasture or pen. Ideally, animals need to be familiar with the care givers and have had some exposure or interaction with them prior to being gathered. Every time we interact with an animal we are training them. And just like with people, you only get one chance to make a first impression and that first impression often determines whether the animal trusts you or their environment for the rest of their life or time on your farm. New people or situations make cattle nervous. Watch the signals cows give you. You can tell if a cow just doesn’t want to cooperate or if she is afraid. A spoiled cow that is used to doing what she wants is handled differently than one that is afraid and doesn’t know what you are asking her to do.

In our busy culture, patience isn’t always easy to practice. With cattle, however, exercising patience is essential. Cattle can be worked with coercion and often are because of inadequate or untrained labor and poorly designed facilities and just plain too much to do in a day. However, even if we get a chore done fast without injury to cattle or people, the stress on our cattle may cost us in the long run. Recent animal performance research has shown us that even with low stress handling there is a negative effect on cattle health or performance just from working them through the chute. This is a trade off since our purpose to work them is to apply an animal health procedure or product or collect important data. Our goal then should be to minimize the negative impact on health, well-being or performance. While it seems like a contradiction, slower is faster when working cattle. READ MORE

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SEMEN READY TO BE SHIPPED FOR THIS NEW LAUTNER SIRE- “TOTAL PERFECTION” CALL TODAY 800-515-3284!!!

Author: Kristy

When has the opportunity come along to use a black TH & PHA Free son with this much style and look??Probably never? This ¾ Maine Anjou is going to be used by the Best in the Business!! Y’not Join Em!!

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Lay Farms Show Calves

Author: Kristy

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SEMEN NOW COLLECTED AND READY TO BE SHIPPED-COOL WATER- NEW FROM LAUTNER FARMS!

Author: Kristy

AS THE SAYING GOES, “COOL AS THE FLIP SIDE OF THE PILLOW” AND THAT BEST DESCRIBES COOL WATER. STOUT, CHUNKY BUILT, AWESOME HAIRED AND GREAT COLORED, WITH THE INCREASING POPULARITY AND SUCCESS WITH COLORED CATTLE IN THE PASTURE SALES AND SHOW RING ALIKE.

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Schultz show Cattle & Schultz Farms Pasture Online Sale Sept. 11

Author: Kristy

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Texas Twister order today! 800-515-3284

Author: Kristy

UNDOUBTEDLY THE THICKEST CHAROLAIS CROSS BULL OUT THERE. WITH SEVERAL OF HIS CALVES BRINGING OVER $50,000, MANY OF THE GREAT PRODUCERS ARE INCLUDING HIM IN THEIR PROGRAMS. JUST ASK KORKY WISE AND KENNY LEHMAN 

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Weaver Show Cattle private treaty sale- Sept 15th

Author: Kristy

Weaver Show Cattle HR

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THE BEST COLORED SIRES IN THE INDUSTRY- add some color to your next semen order with Lautner Farms- 800-515-3284

Author: Kristy

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Blach Cattle and Triple JB Cattle Co.

Author: Kristy

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NEW PRICE FOR AMERICA’S #1 SIRE I-80, NOW FOR $35- CALL US TODAY AND ADD HIM TO YOUR BREEDING LINE UP! 800-515-3284!

Author: Kristy

THE NON- BELIEVERS HAVE NOW BECOME BELIEVERS. I-80 RANKS #1 WHEN IT COMES TO MAKING HIGH SELLERS AND IN JUST MAKING GREAT FUNCTIONAL CATTLE. OTHERS CLAIM THEIR SIRE CAN DO WHAT I-80 HAD ALREADY PROVEN TO DO. ALL WE CAN SAY IS , AT LEAST THEY ARE MAKING COMPARISONS TO ONE GREAT BULL! CAN YOU BLAME THEM FOR TRYING? 

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Grazing after the growing season

Author: Kristy

Rogers Gates, South Dakota State University Extension   |  Updated: 08/20/2014

Providing feed for the cowherd represents the largest expenditure in a cow-calf operation and winter feed is the single largest expense in most operations. In light of this season’s favorable growth, what management strategies could be employed to reduce winter feed expenses with a view to improve profitability? Grazing is generally the least expensive way to harvest available feed, so the opportunity to expand the harvest of this year’s abundant supply is worth considering.

Inventory winter feed

Developing a feed inventory at the end of the growing season is straightforward – it’s already accumulated. There’s no need to attempt to anticipate what future conditions may deliver, as is necessary in the spring. A Northern Great Plains cow-calf operation must include some inventory of hay – few winters in this region allow uninterrupted grazing. A strategy which identifies access to feed resources for a “worst case” winter is prudent. This might include hay on hand, hay which could be purchased if needed, and supplemental grain, either owned or available.

Beyond harvested and purchased feeds, inventory of winter grazing likely includes pastures that were designated for winter grazing at the start of the season, but might also include areas that were unused or under-used because of abundant growth. Such conditions may exist on your own property, but might also be available for lease on neighboring properties. The most straight-forward and precise approach to quantifying feed available from potential fall and winter pastures would be to do some clipping. A limited amount of clipping can serve to “calibrate” visual estimates of even the most experienced grazier. Knowing the quantity of herbage available is the starting point for calculating how long a pasture can be grazed and by how many animals.

Protecting vegetation resources

It is often suggested that winter harvest is less damaging than grazing during the growing season, but sticking to a more conservative target is a good practice during the winter as well. Dormant plants are certainly less susceptible to damage from grazing than actively growing plants. However, careless decisions made during the winter can be just as damaging as any other time. Since growth has been completed for the year, assessing the forage available for winter grazing is straightforward. The efficiency with which available forage is utilized tends to be lower during the winter, however. Loss of leaves from dry dormant plants from weathering and disturbance is more rapid and severe than for growing plants. Snow cover will also limit harvest of dormant plants. Area allocated for winter grazing must therefore be greater than during the growing season, some experts suggest doubling the area. Risks of overgrazing, exceeding the “take half, leave half” rule of thumb, are as important during the winter as any other time. While the plant is not actively growing, the importance of residue in providing thermal protection and maintaining the surface structures, such as crown buds, that will initiate growth in the following spring, remains critical.

Nutritional value

In addition to the quantity of available feed, knowing its nutritional value is essential. Nutrient content of dormant forage is generally adequate, especially for the needs of a mature, dry cow. Recently weaned, growing animals have higher nutritional needs, but even they can be maintained and grow slowly on dormant forage that is allocated appropriately. If the rationale for winter grazing is to limit costs, expenditures for supplemental feed should be minimized. Protein is likely to be the first limiting nutrient in dormant pasture. Needs for supplementation will increase as nutrient demands increase, particularly for a pregnant female. Testing the nutrient content of the vegetation animals are selecting provides the best guidelines for determining needs for supplementation. Visual “estimates” are really not useful in evaluating nutrient content. A much better practice is to clip or hand pluck vegetation most likely to be consumed by cattle – concentrating on leaves and upper portions of the plant. Chemical analysis of samples provides guidance to develop supplementation plans that meet, but don’t exceed the delivery of expensive supplemental nutrients.

Fall or winter grazing may also provide opportunities to “add value” to the dormant forage. Many operations will make decisions about cows to cull during fall weaning. Because most culls are sold immediately, lowest prices for cull cows generally occur during this fall period. Retaining cull cows and grazing them through the autumn and at least part of the winter may allow later sale at higher seasonal prices. After weaning, cows will generally gain weight and condition which will also contribute to increased value. Purchasing additional culls to harvest underused pastures might also increase revenue.

Adding value to dormant season pasture

Operations that traditionally sell calves immediately after weaning might consider delaying that sale, again as a mechanism to add value to available pasture forage, grazing yearlings through part of the winter. Retaining yearlings to graze next summer provides much greater flexibility than immediate investment in breeding females. If growing conditions are favorable next year, yearlings could be retained for all or part of the spring and summer. If not, they can be liquidated.

Winter grazing requires prudent planning. Provision must be made for adequate water accessibility, protection from severe conditions and contingency plans to provide feed during blizzards or heavy snow cover. Nonetheless, grazing dormant pasture could provide an alternative to reduce winter feed costs.

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No Worries With LF Calving Ease Sires Order Now 800.515.3284

Author: Kristy

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Featuring a monopoly sired heifer-Ad from Gray Show Cattle

Author: Kristy

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The Usual Suspects Sale-September 15th

Author: Kristy

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